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Volunteer Companion Program

Consider Volunteering!

The Alzheimer Society’s Volunteer Companion Program has a lot to offer.

Volunteers have weekly visits to share social and recreational activities with a person who has Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia. Volunteers are paired with someone who has expressed interest in having one-on-one weekly visits in their home. Volunteers encourage their companions to participate in activities that they will enjoy, find stimulating and will embrace their interests and abilities. This might involve going for a walk, going for coffee, playing a game of cards, baking cookies, a drive in the country, curling, golf, looking at old photos, gardening, music, dancing, or reminiscing about old times.

Both the volunteer and person with dementia will gain a new companion, while the caregiver is able to have some free time. Education on Alzheimer's disease and other dementias is provided through our training program.

Clients are people with Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia, typically living in the community with caregivers, such as spouses or adult child. They are generally in the early to mid-stage of the disease and are able to perform most activities of daily living on their own.

If you are interested – volunteers need to be 18 year(s) and older, responsible for their own transportation, visiting dates and times are flexible based on when the volunteer and the family is available with visits being approximately 2 hours per week with a minimum commitment of 6 months – 1 year.

You can fill out our online application here.

Volunteers with access to vehicles are also strongly encouraged to apply.

What is needed – volunteers will undergo a screening process and have an information interview. A police check for the vulnerable sector and two references are required.  

Training and support is also provided by the Alzheimer Society, which is a major requirement, and there is on-going or provided on an as-needed basis.

Skills and experience – volunteers may have previous experience either with a family member diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease or related dementia, they may have volunteered with individuals who have a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease or related dementia, they may also have a desire to give back to their community and have no experience or encounter with the disease.


Last Updated: 08/18/16
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