History

The Alzheimer Society of Montreal’s Evolution

Founded in 1981, the Alzheimer Society of Montreal was the first Alzheimer Society in Quebec. This non-profit organization is now part of a group of 135 Alzheimer Societies in Canada, including 20 in Quebec. Together, the latter form the Quebec Federation of Alzheimer Societies, which in turn is a member of the Alzheimer Society of Canada. The Federation is also affiliated with the international organization Alzheimer Disease International.

Today, the Alzheimer Society of Montreal acknowledges that, in addition to its initial mandates to inform, educate, provide social support and promote research, it must also exert greater influence on the practices of healthcare professionals who work with people affected by the disease.

time line 

1981

A small group of visionary people, most of them caregivers, faced with limited information regarding Alzheimer’s disease, the lack of knowledge on the subject and, most importantly, the insufficient amount of support available to families touched by the disease, establishes the Alzheimer Society of Montreal.

1983

The Alzheimer Society of Montreal welcomes its first part-time employee. 

1985

The Alzheimer Society of Montreal now has its own premises and hires permanent staff overseen by an executive director, again owing to the support of the general population and business community.

1986

The Alzheimer Society of Montreal creates the Quebec Federation of Alzheimer Societies, creating a stronger link between the five existing regional Alzheimer Societies in Quebec.

1989

Creation of the “Identity Book and Bracelet” programme, precursor to the existing national Safely HomeMC programme.

1990

The Alzheimer Society of Montreal opens the first of its three Activity Centres for people with loss of autonomy and cognitive impairment.

The Activity Centre is known for its personal approach, with specially trained staff to accompany every participant.

1993

A new management team revitalizes the organization, marking the beginning of a new generation of systematic major fundraising events.

1996

Ever abreast of new trends, the Alzheimer Society of Montreal establishes the first support group in Canada for people with the disease.

1999

The Alzheimer Society of Montreal launches the Forget-Me-Not Programme for healthcare professionals. The programme encourages professionals to develop, in their work environment, stimulation, awareness-raising and educational activities to improve the quality of life of people with the disease.

2000

The Alzheimer Society of Montreal begins a qualitative and quantitative study, conducted by doctors Nora Kelner and Rita Bonar, to identify and evaluate the needs of the Montreal community. The study views cultural and ethnic diversity as an important characteristic of this community.

2001

A new strategic planning process is developed based on recommendations from the study initiated the previous year.

2002

The Alzheimer Society of Montreal’s Board of Directors adopts an action plan changing its priorities, and reorganises its services according to needs identified in its community.

2003

The Alzheimer Society of Montreal reveals the findings of its study at the 25th Annual Conference of the Alzheimer Society of Canada, in Ottawa.

2004

The Alzheimer Society of Montreal hosts the 26th Annual Conference of the Alzheimer Society of Canada, where it announces that its plans to open an “Alzheimer House” in Montreal.

2005 - Planning for the Future

With a well-known consulting firm, the Alzheimer Society of Montreal begins a review of its major strategic orientations.

2006

The Alzheimer Society of Montreal restructures its development programme, doubling its revenues. It now has the means to create a new position in communications.

2008

The Alzheimer Society of Montreal officially inaugurates “First Link,” a new tool for doctors and healthcare professionals. “First Link” aims to offer people with the disease and their family members optimum support at the crucial moment of diagnosis and throughout the progression of the disease.


Last Updated: 11/08/2017