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Tanz Centre for Research in Neurodegenerative Diseases

Alzheimer Society of Ontario is a co-founder and lead funder of the Tanz Centre for Research in Neurodegenerative Diseases at the University of Toronto. The Tanz Centre is an internationally-acclaimed research centre that has revolutionized the approach to brain research. The Centre consistently breaks new ground in the prevention, treatment and cure for Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia. ASO has given a total of $12 million to the Tanz centre since its launch.

 

Led by Professor Peter St George-Hyslop, an international authority on the genetics and mechanisms of neurodegenerative disorders, the Tanz Centre has been the setting for many crucial discoveries related to Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and other devastating conditions.

The Tanz centre is one of the leaders in Neurodegenerative disease research publications in North America and Europe. Tanz Centre articles are widely cited by researchers and experts. These include 435 papers in peer reviewed journals, and 411 lectures and other universities, and meetings and symposia around the world.

25 years at the Tanz, with funding from donors and granting agencies, researchers have:

 

  • Discovered the five genes associated with Alzheimer’s disease
  • Demonstrated that Alzheimer’s disease is a complex disorder with multiple causes
  • Designed an animal model of Alzheimer’s disease, an essential step in furthering biochemical testing
  • Taken the first step in developing effective treatments for the Alzheimer’s disease in the continuing search for a cure
  • Advanced the understanding of the dysfunctional of two key proteins in the development of some form of parkinson’s disease
  • Developed new insights into the protein involved in the development of Creitzfeldt-Jakob disease and mad cow disease, and discovered an antibody that may assist diagnosis and treatment
  • Developed the first antibody that labels a misfolded protein implicated in ALS. The antibody could be used as a biomarker for ALS or to develop drugs or immunization therapies 

Last Updated: 04/20/16
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