Living with dementia

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Disorientation and getting lost

People living with dementia tell us that their independence matters to them and that getting out and about, sometimes alone, is an important part of maintaining an active and independent lifestyle after a diagnosis of dementia.

Due to physical changes to the brain caused by dementia, sometimes people living with dementia will become disoriented, even in familiar places. This might mean that you become confused, even for a few moments, or find it hard to get home.

Why is this important?

There is a risk of becoming lost at any stage of the dementia journey. Even if you are not currently experiencing disorientation, you may want to learn more about what wandering, a symptom of dementia, can look like and put some safety strategies in place for the future.

Disorientation and getting lost: A guide for people living with dementia

The Alzheimer Society of B.C.’s resource Disorientation and getting lost: A guide for people living with dementia can help you and your support network explore a variety of practical strategies to minimize the risk of getting lost and to be prepared if an incident does occur.

Disorientation-and-dementia 
Disorientation and getting lost: A guide for people living with dementia (fill in online and print)

Instructions for use: Once you have opened the document, go to “File” and select “Save as” to save it on your computer. This will allow you to continue adding and editing information. To write directly in the PDF, use the cursor to click on a section with lines. This will open a text box where you can type in your answer.

Print version

Disorientation and getting lost: A guide for people living with dementia (print and fill in by hand)

Connect with the Alzheimer Society of B.C.

The Alzheimer Society of B.C. can assist people living with dementia and their families to explore a variety of practical strategies to minimize the risk of getting lost and to be prepared if an incident does occur. Contact your local Alzheimer Resource Centre or the First Link® Dementia Helpline at 1-800-936-6033. 

 


Last Updated: 09/11/17
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