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Make national dementia plan a priority in Federal Budget says Alzheimer Society of Canada

Society asks for $3M in start-up funding

January 15, 2014, Toronto, ON – As Alzheimer Awareness Month continues throughout January, Mimi Lowi-Young, CEO, Alzheimer Society of Canada, will be asking the Honourable Alice Wong, Minister of State (Seniors), to make dementia a priority in the 2014 Federal Budget when she attends pre-budget hearings being held in Toronto today.

On behalf of the 747,000 Canadians living with dementia, Lowi-Young will ask the Government to allocate $3 million in start-up funding to create the Canadian Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia Partnership. The Partnership would bring together thought-leaders, planners and advocates across the government, health, research, academia and industry sectors, as well as families impacted by dementia, to facilitate and develop a National Dementia Plan to
  • increase investment in research
  • enhance support for family caregivers
  • increase dementia skills and training of health-care providers
  • improve early diagnosis, treatment and prevention
  • strengthen the integration of care and support

Last December health ministers from G8 countries, including Minister Rona Ambrose, agreed upon 12 declarations at the first-ever G8 Summit on Dementia in London, England. Chief among these: world government must start developing plans to tackle the spiralling human and economic costs of dementia.

“2013 was an incredible year for dementia,” says Lowi-Young, who was invited by G8 president David Cameron to attend the historic conference. “It was gratifying to see our Government participate in this Summit, which is bringing dementia to a new international level. We were equally encouraged to see the Government renew its commitment to dementia research in the recent Federal Throne Speech, and we’re pleased to be invited by Minister Wong to make our case.”

Left unchecked, dementia will affect 1.4 million Canadians by 2031, with economic costs soaring to $293 billion per year by 2040.

“No doubt we’re living in tough economic times, but dementia is a long-standing issue we we’ve been lobbying for and which requires bold measures. Canada has excellent resources, skills and research capital. What we need now is a comprehensive plan to pull these elements together. Canadians with dementia deserve care and service that is cost-efficient, and effective and improves their quality of life. We can’t afford to let this opportunity slip by.”

To find out more the Alzheimer Society and the Canadian Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia Partnership or about the Alzheimer Society, visit www.alzheimer.ca

About the Alzheimer Society Canada
The Alzheimer Society is the leading nationwide health charity for people living with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. Active in communities right across Canada, the Society offers help for today through our programs and services, and hope for tomorrow by funding research into the cause, prevention and a cure.

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Media contact:
Rosanne Meandro
Director, Media Relations
Direct: 416-847-8920
Mobile: 416-669-5715
rmeandro@alzheimer.ca
www.alzheimer.ca

Last Updated: 11/07/16
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